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Jaipur : 285 Years and many more ….

Proud to be known for my work as a Photographer. I am equally privileged that it was Jaipur where I honed my skill as a Photographer. Here is a tribute to my favorite city through my lens…

Panoramic view of Badi Chaupar (4 pictures stitched together)

BADI CHAUPAR –  It’s a square that occurs at the intersection of east west roads with three north south roads. Each Badi and Choti chaupar are  around 100m x 100m. They were used for public gathering on festive occasions. The width of the square chaupars was three times that of the main street.

The lampposts running through the center of Johari Bazaar, Jaipur depicts an image of the rising sun, a common symbol of the rulers.You can not miss the Pigeon sitting on them 🙂

Hawa Mahal (हवा महल or  “Palace of Winds”), is a palace in Jaipur at Badi Chaupar. It was built in 1799 by Maharaja Sawai Pratap Singh. Its unique five-storey exterior is also akin to the honeycomb of the beehive with its 953 small windows called jharokas.

An old gate inside the walled city. JMC (Jaipur Municipal Corporation) has stamped it in the year 1948.

Beautiful stone carved Elephant at Roop Chatrubhuj temple at Choti Chaupar

Isar Lat or Sargasuli is known as the tower to heaven. It is situated near the Tripolia gate in the capital city of Rajasthan. It was built by Sawai Ishwari Singh in 1749 to commemorate a grand battle victory.

Stepwells, also called bawdi (बावड़ी) inside Panna Meena Kunda near Amber in Jaipur.

Puppets for sale inside the walled city of Jaipur

Painted Elephants during Elephant Festival that is held every year in Feb/March

Maharaja High School at Badi Chaupar, Jaipur. Probably one of the oldest school of Jaipur

Johari Bazaar, the jeweler’s market of the city.

Boat ride to re-discover Jal Mahal which is likely to be constructed by Sawai Jai Singh II around 1734.

A beautiful Chatri at Badi Chaupar, one of the hidden treasure of Jaipur

Jaipur’s walled city was one of the most well planned city. The rules are still quite strict and generally followed.

Rays of hope on a winter morning at Kulish Smriti Van, Jaipur

Domestic and Foreign travellers rubbing shoulders to witness Elephant Festival which is held every year a day prior to Holi

Few of the 953 small jharokha (Windows) of Hawa Mahal Jaipur

Darbar Hall of Hotel Diggi Palace during Jaipur Literature Festival, perfect fusion of heritage, literature and glamor.

Choti Maharani ka Nauhara at Gangauri Bazaar, Jaipur. You can’t miss the Pink here 🙂

Restored Jal Mahal at night, Jaipur

Mandana painting at Jawahar Kala Kendra, Jaipur. This is a traditional painting which is done on the houses in village.

Pink all the way. Although there are many theories floating around as to why Jaipur was painted Pink, the most accepted one is that pink is the traditional color of hospitality, and the city was freshly painted and paved with pink gravel to warmly welcome Edward VII for his visit here in 1876.

Jaipur : a perfect blend of all activities

Goddess of Teej during Teej Festival

Jal Mahal at night, Jaipur

Folk artist performing Fire trick at a festival

Hawa Mahal, Jaipur another perspective

Jaipur is all about splashing colours.

Vivid Colours of Jaipur, painted Elephant legs during Elephant Festival

The heritage town is now a technologically developed city. A board during JLF where visitors can download festival schedule on their mobile. There are number of wifi zones available for travellers.

This is Phase -I of the blog. This is scheduled to be updated and eventually will be available as an app on Android and iOS. Keep following this space.

Gaurav Hajela (gaurav@pathfynder.in)

Jaipur Beat

Celebrations · Eco-friendly Diwali · Healthy Living · Jaipur · Jaipur Beat · Jaipur Happenings

Save Your City- Go Green, this Diwali!

Diwali Festival spells sparkle, festivity and fire crackers. But the joy of diwali celebration could actually be damaging our planet in the long term!

So this year, why not “Go Green”?

We don’t mean to stop celebrating the festival but we actually mean to change the way we  celebrate this festival of lights…

It’s not as difficult as you thought, just a bit of efforts will make your city free from environmental hazards.

Go for fresh flowers, daals Rangoli


Colourful rangoli is synonymous with decorating the house for Diwali. Colours used to create these magical rangolis contain harmful chemicals.

So why not opt for fresh flower petals or can even consider using colourfuldaals/ beans or even spice powders off the kitchen shelf.

Decorate with your imagination and play around like-

yellow- haldipowder, orange peels-orange color, beetroot peel for magenta, blood red chilly powder, green moong daal or an orange masoor daal.

Avoid fire crackers that pollute the air…
It may be fun to watch the fire crackers light up the dark sky on Diwali,, but have you spared a thought for the fact that this temporary joy actually causes air and noise pollution?

Avoid fire crackers this Diwali or minimize lighting up if you must, and contribute towards  keeping the planet green!

No fancy lighting; go for diyas
Avoid using wasteful electric illumination or fairy lights to brighten up your home or establishment. Opt for the traditional earthen oil lamps, which actually create a magical effect.

Earthern diyas are a zillion times better and more beautiful than fancy lights!

 

Let’s celebrate an eco-friendly diwali with your friends & family!

Events in Jaipur · Jaipur · Jaipur Beat · Jaipur Happenings · Rajasthan events

DSC Jaipur Literature Festival 2013 announced


–   The annual festival scheduled for 24th – 28th January, 2013, at Diggi Palace, Jaipur

–   Music stage to shift to a new venue at The Clarks (Amer) Lawns

–   Online registration and press accreditation has begun

The much-awaited sixth annual DSC Jaipur Literature Festival, where literary talents flaunt from across the globe, has been scheduled from 24th to 28th January, 2013, at Diggi Palace in Jaipur. The five-day festival will encompass a wide range of activities including debates, discussions, readings, music, and workshops for the audiences.

The DSC Jaipur Literature Festival is considered to be Asia’s leading literature event, celebrating national and international writers, and encompassing a range of activities including film, music and theater.  The festival has already hosted some of the best-known national and international writers including Orhan Pamuk,Alexander McCall Smith, Donna Tartt, Tina Brown, Shashi Tharoor, Mohammed Hanif, Paul Zacharia, among many others.

This year, too, the Festival will showcase the diversity of writing in Indian languages with over 16 languages represented, including Hindi, Urdu, Rajasthani, Tamil, Telugu, Bhojpuri, Maithili, Punjabi, Bangla, Malayalam, Gujarati, Sindhi, Kannada, and Kashmiri. A special emphasis will be on the transition of Maithili and Bhojpuri literature from the traditional to the contemporary.

The themes and session strands at the Festival will focus on a wide range of topics, some of which are: The Buddha in Literature, The Republic of Ideas (a Republic Day focus on ideas of India), Re-imagining the Kama SutraHindi-English Bhai Bhai, Alternative Sexualities, Lok Geet Folk Geet, Bollywood ki Nayi Sanskriti,and Bibliodiversity Dialogues. The session, Remembering Sunil Da, will pay tribute to the late Sunil Gangopadhyay, who had once again accepted our invitation to attend the Festival in 2013 before his tragic demise. International sessions at the Festival will explore Russian literature, the Jewish novel, Shakespeare, Kipling, cricket writing, the New Africa, Iran, and writing on the contemporary art scene.

Glimpses from previous edition

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Like all its previous editions, this year’s Festival is open to all. A new venue, the Char Bagh, has been added to the existing venues at Diggi Palace to expand its capacity by another 5,000 people per hour. The DSC Jaipur Literature Festival continues to be the largest free literature festival and among the five largest such festivals in the world, with a unique visitor registration of 57,000, and a footfall of more than 122,000 in 2012.

Registrations for the Festival’s 2013 edition have begun for delegates, members of the media, and the general public. Details on registration and accreditation are available at the following link on the Festival’s website, jaipurliteraturefestival.org/registration/. While on-the-spot registration will be available at the venue, guests are encouraged to register online in advance to avoid long queues. Special rates at hotels associated with the Festival are available for those seeking accommodation. Online booking closes on 21st January, 2013.

Some of the authors who have confirmed their presence at the Festival in 2013 are: Ambai, Benyamin, Bhalchandra Nemade, Diana Eck, Elizabeth Gilbert, Erica Jong, Frank Dikkoter, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Gulzar, Hisham Matar, Homi Bhabha, Howard Jacobson, Javed Akhtar, Kancha Ilaiah, Kunwar Narain, Linda Grant, Madeline Miller, Michael Sandel, Michel Houellebecq, Nadeem Aslam, Neelesh Mishra, Orlando Figes, Pico Iyer, Reza Aslan, Simon Armitage, and Zoe Heller.

In 2012, the Festival hosted around 258 speakers, including 250 international and Indian authors, and over 100 performing artists from across the world.

For further details contact:

Imtiaz Alam

Mob.+91 98102 27818

E-Mailimtiaalam@gmail.comimtiaz.alam@ketchumsampark.com

Ketchum Sampark Pvt. Ltd.