Celebrations · Cultural festivals · Events in Jaipur · Fairs & Festivals · Jaipur · Jaipur Beat · Jaipur Happenings · Uncategorized

This Diwali, Let’s Keep Our Culture Alive!

Preserved and passed on for generations, the elixir of living the life and the footprints of our ancestors, the culture, the traditions and the zeal of life. Diwali is not just about a festival in our country. It is more about heritage, and its preservation.

On Diwali we celebrate the return of Ram from 14 years of exile, and growing up, Diwali was all about lighting up diyas, cooking sweet Indian delicacies, sparking fire crackers, and worshipping Lord Ganesha and goddess Laxmi. With the change in time and tradition, we are losing the grip on soul of this festival. Here are a few things we all need to turn back to this Diwali!

  1. The Elaborate Diwali Pooja- The elaborate Diwali pooja always used to be a family affair but now it is also losing its value to us. The conventional ways of celebrating Diwali started by pooja are changing with most of the youngsters migrating to different cities for education and job. We should learn to pray on our own if we cannot reach home on Diwali. 🙂

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  1. Sweets– Where there is celebration, there has to be sweets, but nowadays we are turning towards chocolates and other dessert options that are known to be #gluttonfree #cholesterolfree #fatfree and whatnot. We are forgetting that the delicious recipes of homemade sweets like laddus, gulabjamun, barfi, halwa, mathri, etc. that have been handed down to us by our nani and dadi are much healthier and delightful in every sense.

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  1. New Clothes- The zeal of the festival Diwali needs to be kept alive with new clothes, because Diwali also marks a new beginning, the end of evil and the victory of the good. We promise you that you are going to have a worthy stock of pictures for Instagram with a new ethnic attire.

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  1. Cleaning our homes- Scientifically, it is a good idea to clean your house around mid-October and mid-November because after the monsoon, cleaning makes sure all the germs and infectants are eradicated from the house.

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Although, religiously it is believed that goddess Laxmi visits the homes of devotees on the night of Diwali to bless them with happiness, luck and prosperity for the rest of the year. Therefore, we illuminate and decorate our houses with diyas, lights and rangoli.

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  1. Firecrackers- Burning of firecrackers also carries a scientific logic behind itself apart from the celebration. The heat produced in the environment due to burning of the crackers makes sure that all the disease causing microbes are removed from the environment after the end of monsoon. But the perpetually increasing pollution restricts us from doing so, and we can opt for lighting mustard oil diyas for the same effect.

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So this Diwali, let’s make a promise that we are not going to feel guilty about having an extra gulab jamun, or bursting the fire crackers, that we are not going to wear that old comfortable jeans, rather try a slightly uncomfortable but new dress; that we are going to make sure our houses are spick and span before Diwali. Let’s make a promise to preserve the enriched culture handed down to us by our ancestors.

Happy Diwali!

 

 

 

Events in Jaipur · Jaipur · Jaipur Beat · Jaipur During Monsoon · Monsoon · Rajasthan events · Rajasthan tourism · Teej · Teej Celebration In Jaipur · Teej In Jaipur · Uncategorized

Let’s Celebrate Teej With Great Zeal In Jaipur

The hues of love, culture and beauty mingled with the tints of heritage, handicrafts and a grand legacy brought down the generations. You are pink, I am pink; for pink is the color that this city leaves in our hearts forever. Jaipur, also known as the ‘Pink City’ was founded by Maharaja Jai Singh II in November, 1727. Known worldwide for its rich culture and architectural beauty, Jaipur is the largest city of Rajasthan, and its capital too. What makes it different from all other cities is its deeply rooted heritage that houses in itself not just the beauty of traditions and different art forms but also paves way for technological and architectural advancements. Whether it is about festivals or food, travel and tourism or corporal sector, Jaipur has a niche for every possible genre.

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The months of July and August are the most prismatic ones in Jaipur. The city looks dipped into and drunk on rainbows. With the petrichor mixing in with the amazing fragrance of our favourite ‘chai and pakode’ comes again the most voraciously celebrated festival of ‘Teej’. Teej is one of the most colourfully celebrated festivals in Jaipur. It’s all about women dressed in jazzy leheriya, patricoloured lehengas, ‘Mehendi ki khushbu’ and ‘Saawan ke jhule’. And when it comes to Teej, how could we forget our favourite Malai Ghewar!

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Teej falls on the third day after new moon. Teej as a festival is celebrated three times during the Indian month of Shravan, namely Hariyali teej, Kajli Teej, and Hartalika Teej. Badi Teej is celebrated with great zeal and pomp in our Jaipur city. Married women fast for the day and pray to Goddess Parvati for the long lives of their husbands and children. Young girls put on vibrant lehangas and leheriya sarees and enjoy the swings under lush green trees. As magnificent as this festival is, it keeps an immensely important place in the hearts of Jaipurites. We celebrate it with all kinds of food and festive preparations. Jaipur’s Teej celebration is not only famous across the nation, but also known across the globe for its enlivening and pulsing rituals, and traditions.

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The very famous Rajasthani dessert ‘Ghewar’ is the authentic food associated with Teej. Other savoury dishes associated with Teej are ‘Malpua,’ ‘Kesar Jalebi,’ and ‘Mirchi Pakode.’ The mere thought of a kesar jalebi or a delicious malpua melting in our mouths is enough to get us high on love for this festival!

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Besides the amazing excitement among common people for Teej, every year the Rajasthan Tourism carries out a pageant procession that passes from various areas of the old city of Jaipur including Tripolia Bazar, Chaugan Stadium  and Talkatora. Rajasthani folk dances, palanquins, tableaux, vividly ornamented elephants and drama are different parts of this vibrant pageant that takes place on the day of Haryali Teej. Scores of Jaipurites along with national as well as international tourists turn up to enjoy the festivities of this grand pageant. Apart from the common spectators, it also attracts hundreds of photographers and videographers for the extravaganza. Teej Procession is one of the biggest pageant held in Jaipur, over the year.

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Teej, for Jaipurites is not a mere monsoon festival, it is also a feeling of being tied to our colourful roots of Rajasthani tradition, that keep the beauty and avidity for culture alive year after year.

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Carnival of ‘Sawan Teej’ Begins In Jaipur From August 7

Monsoon is at its peak in Rajasthan. When the torrential rain in the month of August falls on the parched land of Rajasthan and the lovely aroma of the wet soil mounts in the air, Rajasthan rejoices the Teej festival that relates to the Shiva-Parvati. The best place to experience Teej festivities is the capital of Rajasthan; Jaipur where it is celebrated with immense fun and elaboration.
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Jaipur will celebrate the five-day Sawan Teej from August 7-11 with regal pomp and pageantry of the traditional Teej procession. Like every year, Jawahar Kala Kendra will be the hub of a large number of folks and cultural events.

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Teej Procession on 09-10 August

The royal Teej procession will begin on 09 August at 6 pm from the Tripoliya Gate (City Palace), winding its way through Tripolia Bazar and Chhoti Chaupar, Gangauri Bazaar to wind up at the Chaugan Stadium. The procession will also leave next day at the same time. Thirty elephants are going to participate in the grandiose procession. Elephants will carry the symbol and lead the event. In the procession, there will be melange of cultural performances likes Kachhi Ghodi, Gair, Kalibaliya and chakri dances. The procession will include: the cannon carriage, bullock carts, horse baggi, decorated rath, horses and camels. A number of bands will also accompany the procession.  The sawari of the Goddess Teej will be almost at the end followed by chobdar. The Department of Tourism has also made arrangements for the tourists to photograph the procession from the terrace of the Hind Hotel opposite Tripoliya gate.

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Performances at JKK

At JKK, celebration of Teej festivity will begin from 9 August from 7 pm onwards. On the first day there will be a performance by Shalu Jindal (Kuchipudi dance) followed by Vidya Shah (Sugam Sangeet). Next day, on 10 August, the visitors will be able to witness the well known Sufi Singer Sonam Kalra. On 11 August, will be folk music by Malini Awasthi followed by performances of the Rajasthani folk artists.

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 Food & Craft Mela at JKK

To add more vigor to the festivity, there will be a food and craft mela from 7 August to 11 August (from 2 pm to 10 pm) at Shilpgram in JKK.  While visitors will be able to enjoy the ethnic Rajasthani food there will also a cultural bonanza by way of folk performances. A wide variety of handicrafts will also be available for sale.

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Time to indulge in monsoon festivities and make merry !! 🙂

 

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Rejoicing Sawaan with Teej Festival- 9th & 10th August

Teej is one of the most widely celebrated festivals of Rajasthan. Swings, traditional songs and dancing are the unique features of Teej celebrations in Rajasthan. Women perform traditional folk dance dressed in green coloured clothes and sing beautiful Teej songs while enjoying their sway on swings bedecked with flowers.
Teej is celebrated with immense fun and fanfare in the capital city of Jaipur. On this day, women and young girls wear their best clothes and adorn themselves with fine jewellery. They gather at a nearby temple or a common place and offers prayers to Goddess Parvati for well being of their husbands.

Pic Courtesy- Gaurav Hajela
Pic Courtesy- Gaurav Hajela

On the occasion of Teej, markets in Jaipur are stocked with trendiest women accessories and clothes. Most of the fabric clothes display ‘laheria’ (tie and dye) prints. Sweetshops keep different Teej sweets but ‘Ghevar and Feeni’ is the main sweet of the season.
All over Rajasthan, swings are hung from trees and decorated with fragrant flowers. Women both married and unmarried love to swing on these swings to celebrate the ‘Sawan festival’.
As always, sitting arrangements for tourist will be done on the terrace of Hind Hotel, opposite Tripoliya Gate on 9 and 10 August during the traditional Teej Procession in Jaipur.

Pic Courtesy- Gaurav Hajela
Pic Courtesy- Gaurav Hajela

Traditional Teej Procession in Jaipur:
The traditional Teej procession with all its regal pomp and pageantry, will start on 9 August at 6 pm from the Tripoliya Gate (City Palace), winding its way through Tripolia Bazar and Chhoti Chaupar, Gangauri Bazaar to wind up at the Chaugan Stadium. The procession will also leave next day at the same time.

Pic Courtesy- Gaurav Hajela
Pic Courtesy- Gaurav Hajela

In the procession of Goddess Teej, right in the front will be folk performances like kacchi ghodi, Kalbeliya, Algoza, Bahrupia, Gair, Bail Dance and Chakri dance, among others. In the procession the tourists and the visitors will also be able to witness a large number of bands, ornamented camels, mounted police on horses, women in traditional dress with Kalash and Dhalet Chobadars.

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